Blog — Wine Appreciation RSS



Winemaker Uncorked Update

Just settling some confusion with a quick update... As a newbie to the wine industry, I am learning on the job. Not only on how things are done but also all the little ins and outs! Mind blowing just how and what the winemakers can do to produce that perfect drop! The big thing I have learnt recently is about the buying and selling of fruit, before it even makes it in the bottle. You may have noticed the excitement that surrounded our first planting day in November 2016. We had a fabulous few days with family visiting and our dream coming to life. Recently, I posted photos on instagram of fully netted vines with little legs skipping down them. Like a toddler,...

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The Story Behind Our Logo

Since launching our wine earlier this year, we have received many wonderful comments about our name, logo and label design. So I thought I would share the story behind it, how it came about and how we ended up with the final design.  In February 2015, while Rohan was busy harvesting grapes at his parent's vineyard, I was pregnant. Having finished teaching the year before, I was trying to get as much achieved as possible before our baby boy was born. Rohan had been planning to make his first "serious" wine for a number of months, and with the hot temperatures, he was checking the vineyard everyday. He had made wine from his parent's grapes before, but never on this...

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Dry v's Sweet

All wines begin with ripe fruit which contains sugar. Wines that are considered sweet usually have what is called residual sugar, this means the yeast that produce the alcohol were stopped by the winemaker to leave some sugar in the wine. A dry wine is a wine that has been fermented to the point where there is no fermentable sugar left. This means that the yeast have turned all the sugar that they can into alcohol. Any sweetness that may be left in the wine can be attributed to oak and/or un-fermentable sugars. Often a wine can have a sweet taste, but still be considered a dry wine. The levels of acidity, tannin and aroma all affect how sweet a wine tastes....

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Wines with Bubbles

Champagne is a region in France and under EU and international laws only wine that comes from the region can be labelled as Champagne. Sparkling wine, on the other-hand, can be made just about anywhere, using the traditional method or by simply adding carbon dioxide. The traditional method (or Méthode Champenoise) for introducing bubbles in the wine involves a secondary fermentation in the bottle. This is essentially achieved by adding yeast and sugar to each bottle. As the fermentation takes place carbon dioxide is released, which creates the bubbles. Cheaper sparkling wines simply carbonate the wine by injecting carbon dioxide, like a soft drink. What is the difference between tasting a still wine and a sparkling wine? Obviously the main...

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Wine Tasting - The Basics

A lot of wine tasting relates to past experience. Remembering wines previously tasted, sensations on the palette, regional nuances, wine styles, knowing what to look for and what flavours are specific to each variety. When you are new to wine this can seem a bit daunting, and remembering all the information that is thrown your way can take the fun out of it. Often when you are tasting wine, perceptions can override senses. You are better off trusting your own instinct rather than listening to someone tell you what you should be finding in the wine. To start the journey into wine tasting you should start with wines that you like, and not be swayed by the opinions of others....

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