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Winemaker Uncorked Happenings

So much has been happening on the Winemaker Uncorked front lately – vintage, our son turned one and we purchased acreage at Trentham, Victoria to set up Rohan’s dream of his own vineyard, winery and cellar door. While all of this will take time, we have sold our house in Echuca and have moved down to Woodend temporary while we get things sorted at the new place. So now comes the exciting time of thinking up a new label name – we will continue with our Winemaker Uncorked label, using fruit from Rohan’s parents and friends in warmer climates but will need to come up with an estate label. Rohan is finalising all the details for the winery to be...

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Our Online Store is Now Open!

We are very excited to announce that after a quick beach holiday we have all our ducks in a row and our website is ready to go!  We currently have Ruby Cabernet for sale, click below to read a little bit more about this grape variety.  For Rohan, this is an exciting step towards his dream of owning and managing his own winery. A little note from him:"After 15 years of making wine for other people, I've decided it's time to make some wine on my own. This is the first wine released under the Winemaker Uncorked label. These grapes are from my parent's property on the NSW Riverina, from vines I planted 15 years ago. I am excited to hear what...

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Dry v's Sweet

All wines begin with ripe fruit which contains sugar. Wines that are considered sweet usually have what is called residual sugar, this means the yeast that produce the alcohol were stopped by the winemaker to leave some sugar in the wine. A dry wine is a wine that has been fermented to the point where there is no fermentable sugar left. This means that the yeast have turned all the sugar that they can into alcohol. Any sweetness that may be left in the wine can be attributed to oak and/or un-fermentable sugars. Often a wine can have a sweet taste, but still be considered a dry wine. The levels of acidity, tannin and aroma all affect how sweet a wine tastes....

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Wines with Bubbles

Champagne is a region in France and under EU and international laws only wine that comes from the region can be labelled as Champagne. Sparkling wine, on the other-hand, can be made just about anywhere, using the traditional method or by simply adding carbon dioxide. The traditional method (or Méthode Champenoise) for introducing bubbles in the wine involves a secondary fermentation in the bottle. This is essentially achieved by adding yeast and sugar to each bottle. As the fermentation takes place carbon dioxide is released, which creates the bubbles. Cheaper sparkling wines simply carbonate the wine by injecting carbon dioxide, like a soft drink. What is the difference between tasting a still wine and a sparkling wine? Obviously the main...

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Carmenere - A Hidden Variety

One of the best things about being a lover of wine, is that no two wines are the same. My brother-in-law recently messaged from South America asking if I had tried the variety “Carmenere”. I had heard of this, but didn’t know much about it. So I turned to Google – Carmenere is a variety that was originally planted in Bordeaux, France, but it is extremely rare to find it there now. In 1867, a Phylloxera plague nearly destroyed all the vineyards in Europe, and Carmenere was unable to be replanted. It was presumed extinct. That was until it was found in Chile, where growers had preserved Carmenere grapes for over 150 years! I headed to my local liquor store...

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